Which hygiene products are best for girls?

The CDC is investigating a recent rash of cases of chlamydia infections in the United States, and a study has linked a recent outbreak in India to hygiene products.

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection that can lead to painful blisters and other painful infections in girls, including vulvar and anal cancer.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it is “extremely concerned” about the recent spike in infections.

A new study in the journal Pediatrics has found that girls who use products containing soap and water as a disinfectant have been more likely to have symptoms than those who have used safer disinfectant products.

The study, published by the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, looked at the history of cholera cases in five countries in Africa.

It found that among girls who used soap and cleansers as disinfectants in a sample of 3,300 girls, 2.2% were infected with cholestasis and 8.7% with bacterial vaginosis.

In contrast, the risk of infection was higher among girls using disinfectant in the same sample who did not use soap or cleansers.

The researchers say these findings could be an indication that soap and wipes are more likely than safer alternatives to cause infection.

The CDC says the most common risk factors for infection are sharing the same house or apartment, having close contacts, or using a single source of soap and/or cleansers, like a bathroom.

If you have more questions about choleria, call the CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

The CDC is investigating a recent rash of cases of chlamydia infections in the United States, and a study has…